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Mar/Apr 2020
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Mar/Apr 2020
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Botkin
Botkin

Post Editing

O

ne of my very favorite things ever is watching how my five (nearly six) nieces figure out language. Another is watching how they invent games.

Not long ago, without explaining to anyone what they were doing, they started rolling around a sparkly ball with two-year-old Henrietta, and then snatching it away at the last second when she tried to grab it. Contrary to what you might think, she found this hilarious. She added her own flourishes and, between laughter, finally gasped out: “great game!”

And this surprised me for two reasons: one, she knew they’d just made up their own game, despite the fact that nobody had told her that’s what it was. She didn’t mind having her own toy snatched away because she knew it was a game. A funny game. A game of reaction time and ingenuity. Probably because once she actually asked for the ball, it was handed to her with a perfectly straight face.

But secondly, she was linguistically adept enough to express her opinion like the adults around her. Same grammar, same vocabulary. Only a slight blurring of the “r” sound.

Games and language challenges both harken back to this kind of childlike wonder. The curiosity and delight of expression; the curiosity and delight of a novel pastime invented just for the fun of it.

Katie Botkin signature
#188 Volume 31 Issue 2 March/April 2020
Editor-in-Chief, Publisher: Donna Parrish
Managing Editor: Katie Botkin
Proofreaders: Eve Ettinger, Bernie Nova
News, Calendar: Kendra Gray
Production: Darlene Dibble, Doug Jones
Cover Photo: Doug Jones
Technical Analyst: Curtis Booker
Assistant: Kathy Alderman
Circulation: Terri Jadick
Special Projects: Bernie Nova
Advertising Director: Kevin Watson
Marketing Director: Marjolein Groot Nibbelink
Finance: Leah Thoreson

Editorial Board
Games: Miguel Á. Bernal-Merino
Standards: David Filip
Business: Aki Ito
Marketing: Nataly Kelly
User Experience: Ultan Ó Broin
Interpreting: Barry Slaughter Olsen
Technology: Jost Zetzsche

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MultiLingual (ISSN 1523-0309), Copyright © 2020 by MultiLingual Computing, Inc., is published bimonthly: Jan/Feb, Mar/Apr, May/Jun, Jul/Aug, Sep/Oct, Nov/Dec by MultiLingual Computing, Inc., 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Business and Editorial Offices: 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Accounting and Circulation Offices: 319 North 1st Avenue, Suite 2, Sandpoint, ID 83864-1495. Call (208) 263-8178 to subscribe. Periodicals postage paid at Sandpoint, ID and additional mailing offices.

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Robert Jelenic | Global Marketing Director
Are you engaging your global audience fast enough?
Once online, you’re global. And you need to move quickly. The internet created a marketplace faster than anything we’ve ever seen.

To win, you have to connect with your customers on their terms and at top speed.

My mission is to help you achieve your global business vision quickly through expert content that inspires and educates.

Contents
About the Cover:
Enormous mah-jongg tiles in a window display at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, Yerba Buena Lane, San Francisco.
multilingual
LinkedIn Update
Lionbridge and Translators without Borders linkedin posts

Building your success One project at a time

London Office | 590 Green Lanes – London – N13 5RY – UK
Athens Office | 93 Karagiorga Street, Athens 166 75, Greece
Telephone: +30 210 9628 559
Email: production@eurogreek.com
www.eurogreek.com

Recaps

Elia event looks at project management
Hamburg, Germany, December 5- 2019
The fourth edition of Elia’s Focus on Project Management was held in Hamburg, Germany, December 5-6, 2019. This is the largest event in the world dedicated exclusively to the continuous education of translation project and production managers, and was attended by 111 participants representing 28 countries.

Recaps

NTIF 2019 held for the ninth time

The Nordics in November? Who wants to subject themselves to that? Quite a few, it seems, as 183 participants from 25 countries came together in the Swedish city of Gothenburg for the ninth edition of the Nordic Translation Industry Forum (NTIF) November 24-26, 2019. Gothenburg, or Göteborg in Swedish, is sometimes called the largest noncapital of the Nordics and its location by the North Sea makes it a truly international city. The venue carefully chosen for the conference was the recently renovated Elite Park Avenue hotel on the main boulevard Avenyn.

The conference started with two master classes for language service providers: Strategy & Sales and Hands-On NMT. Shortly after, on Sunday evening, all participants were invited to a welcome reception to mingle and get to know each other before the conference began in earnest on Monday.

A Conference speaker.
A Conference speaker.

The Nordics in November? Who wants to subject themselves to that? Quite a few, it seems, as 183 participants from 25 countries came together in the Swedish city of Gothenburg for the ninth edition of the Nordic Translation Industry Forum (NTIF) November 24-26, 2019. Gothenburg, or Göteborg in Swedish, is sometimes called the largest noncapital of the Nordics and its location by the North Sea makes it a truly international city. The venue carefully chosen for the conference was the recently renovated Elite Park Avenue hotel on the main boulevard Avenyn.

The conference started with two master classes for language service providers: Strategy & Sales and Hands-On NMT. Shortly after, on Sunday evening, all participants were invited to a welcome reception to mingle and get to know each other before the conference began in earnest on Monday.

Recaps

Featured Reader

Diego Cresceri, founder and CEO of Creative Words

Would you introduce yourself?
Diego Cresceri, founder and CEO of Creative Words, a localization company based in Genoa, Italy. Besides running my company, I am currently serving on the board of directors of ELIA.

Where do you live?
I live in a small and (too) quiet village right in the middle of the so-called industrial triangle of Milan-Genoa-Turin in Northwestern Italy. Our office is based in Genoa, and that’s where I am planning to move soon.

How did you get started in this industry?
I was lucky (and determined) enough to start an internship as a translator when I was still at university — I graduated in interpreting. After six months I eventually started managing small translation projects and I fell in love with project management, which is what I did for the following three years. Due to one of the company founders leaving in 2008, I was offered the role of partner, and I became the chief operations officer. In 2016, I felt the urge to start a new adventure and that’s when I founded Creative Words.

News

People

Recent industry hires
  • Acrolinx, a provider of strategy-aligned content creation, has hired Volker Smid as chief executive officer (CEO). Smid was most recently CEO of Searchmetrics.

Acrolinx GmbH www.acrolinx.com

  • Language services provider One Global Solutions has hired Paul Williams as business development director.

One Global Solutions www.one-global.com

Business

Transfluent acquires Navitep and Translatum

Transfluent, a developer and provider of digital translation services, has acquired the business activities of Navitep Oy, a developer of translation automation software, and Translatum Oy, an international communications company.

Transfluent www.transfluent.com
Navitep Oy https://navitep.com
Translatum Oy www.translatum.fi

Summa Linguae sells majority stake
Summa Linguae, a language and technology services provider, has sold its majority stake to V4C investment fund and carried out two acquisitions in North America: Globalme, a Canadian company focused on new technologies and big data, and GlobalVision, a provider of localization services for the life science sector.

Summa Linguae https://summalinguae.pl

Products and Services

Global Revenue Forecaster

CSA Research, an independent market research firm specializing in the language service industry, has released the Global Revenue Forecaster designed to provide predictive business analytics tailored to a company’s business and vertical for the revenues to expect from different languages.
Lingoport Suite updates
Lingoport, Inc., a provider of software internationalization tools and services, has released updates to its suite of software that include connectivity to additional translation management systems and a redesigned dashboard.

Lingoport, Inc. www.lingoport.com

KantanSkynet Manager Console
KantanMT, a subscription-based machine translation service, has launched KantanSkynet Manager Console, a post-editing platform that uses AI to determine the quality of translated texts and will automatically route low-quality texts to professional translators for improvements.
TBX Exporter For Excel
Translation software company Pairaphrase has developed a Microsoft Excel add-in called TBX Exporter, for the conversion of .xls, .csv or .xslx files to a TermBase eXchange (.tbx) file.

Pairaphrase www.pairaphrase.com

White Paper
SmartDub
Expand your reach to global markets through AI-based localization
The global video streaming market is expected to be $124.57 billion by 2025 as per a report from Grand View Research. The increasing proliferation of smart devices, combined with content technology players such as Netflix, Amazon, Disney+, Apple TV+ and many others, is powering strong growth and changing user behaviors.

Recent data point to some key trends that will have far-reaching implications in this market over the next few years.

  • The future is mobile

CISCO’s 2019 Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast reports that mobile data traffic has increased 17-fold over the past five years. By the end of 2022, data consumption would reach the one zettabyte mark, a clear indication of unabated mobile adoption and its future ascension.

The report also highlights that with the advent of the smartphone, almost 80% of all mobile data traffic is forecasted to be video content by 2020 — a nine-fold increase from 2017 numbers.

  • The future is global

Netflix very recently released its global subscription details and over 55% of its subscriber base is com-ing from outside of North America, with almost 30% of the subscribers from Asia Pacific and Latin America. Interestingly, APAC and LATAM are the markets with highest share of mobile video stream-ing, as per eMarketer, with over 67% of the global market share. Even in these emerging markets, it is the smaller towns that have a higher share of content consumption as against the Tier 1 cities.

  • Content is local

CSA Research found that roughly 72% of all internet users prefer consuming content in their native language. Even among those with high English proficiency, more than 60% prefer content in their native language.

PIC Winner Award
While these trends present a compelling business case for monetizing video assets globally, there are several challenges in delivering localized mobile optimized videos. These include:

1. Mobile compatibility
2. Quality of output
3. Consumer-centricity and UX engagement
4. Cost efficiency
5. Turnaround time
6. Scalability

How can we help?
SmartDub is a pioneering solution that is built to enhance user experience and produce great output quality for multimedia content. This innovative, AI-enabled dubbing solution allows immense scalabil-ity in the most cost-effective manner. This unique offering transforms content far and beyond its ini-tial scope and purpose; making it consumable in untapped geographies for, and by, new and a wider range of audiences.

Built heavily on emerging technology, the SmartDub solution leverages ML, AI and the latest develop-ments in synthetic voice morphology to deliver the best automated outcome, resulting in faster time-to-market and large-scale processing/delivery potential.

Equally effective for media, entertainment, educa-tion, training and development content, the solution is beneficial to audiences as they can enjoy quality content in their native language from any device, while content businesses reap the benefits of global reach at competitive pricing.

SmartDub is the winner of the recent Process Inno-vation Challenge (PIC) at LocWorld Silicon Valley 2019.

For additional information and details, contact lori.silverstein@spi-global.com

sponsored information

Calendar

March

LATA 2020
March 4-6, 2020, Milan, Italy

Saint Petersburg State University, IRDTA, https://lata2020.irdta.eu

tcworld India
March 5-6, 2020, Bangalore, India
TAUS Global Content Conference & Exhibits 2020

March 10-11, 2019, San Jose, California USA

GALA 2020
March 15-18, 2020, San Diego, California USA

Globalization and Localization Association
www.gala-global.org/conference

Game Developers Conference
March 16-20, 2020, San Francisco, California USA

UBM LLC, www.gdconf.com

XTM LIVE

March 19-20, 2020, Silicon Valley, California USA

XTM International, https://xtmlive.com

7th International Conference on Public Services Interpreting and Translation
March 26-27, 2020, Alcalá de Henares, Spain
Review
Poems from the Edge of Extinction
An Anthology of Poetry in Endangered Languages
Katie Botkin Headshot
Katie Botkin

A eulogy and a battle cry for endangered languages everywhere

Katie Botkin is a freelance writer and the managing editor of MultiLingual. She has a master’s degree in English with an emphasis on linguistics and has taught English on three continents.
Riding the line between educational and lyrical, Poems from the Edge of Extinction features 50 poems from around the world in languages that even the seasoned linguists among us may never have heard of. The anthology was produced in association with the National Poetry Library in London, and was released at the end of 2019, the Year of Endangered Languages. Some of the original works from vulnerable cultures across the globe are without written form, translated from oral traditions — Gondi and Rohingya from Asia, for example.
Poems from the Edge of Extinction Book
Poems from the Edge of Extinction
An Anthology of Poetry in Endangered Languages. Edited by Chris McCabe. Chambers, 2019. Hardback, $21.98. 336 pages.
Poems from the Edge of Extinction
An Anthology of Poetry in Endangered Languages. Edited by Chris McCabe. Chambers, 2019. Hardback, $21.98. 336 pages.
Riding the line between educational and lyrical, Poems from the Edge of Extinction features 50 poems from around the world in languages that even the seasoned linguists among us may never have heard of. The anthology was produced in association with the National Poetry Library in London, and was released at the end of 2019, the Year of Endangered Languages. Some of the original works from vulnerable cultures across the globe are without written form, translated from oral traditions — Gondi and Rohingya from Asia, for example.
The book is organized by continent, but several themes are repeated throughout. Many poems deal with the effects of globalization and the poets’ culture disappearing. In “The ever-touring Englishmen,” translated from the Gondi oral tradition, the people describe how the colonizers of India “have built their bungalows/ All over our sweet forest… With their wires they have bound the whole world together for themselves.”

Other poems take on language itself. “My grandmother never learned Spanish/ was afraid of forgetting her gods,” Mikeas Sanchez describes in Zoque, an indigenous language of Mexico. The English translation of the poem includes curses her grandmother would shout in Zoque — Sanchez describes them as prayers that go unanswered.

Review
Localizing Employee Communications
The ivory tower meets the tower of Babel
Libor Safar Headshot
Libor Safar
Libor Safar is marketing director at RWS Moravia. He has over 20 years’ experience in the localization industry.

Everyone at least slightly involved in the language industry is acutely aware of the fact that local language is critical for products to sell and for ideas to spread. But one final frontier seems to be uncharted: corporate content.

As Val Swisher, CEO of Content Rules, Inc., writes in her forward to Ray Walsh’s Localizing Employee Communications, “employee communications, the internal content that the corporate headquarters shares with employees worldwide, seems to be stuck in the dark English ages.” In his book, Walsh paints the picture of how English-proficient upper managers, living in their ivory towers, frequently assume that their entire organizations speak that language well enough. And how they conclude that, as result, there’s no need to localize or transcreate their internal communications.

Localizing Employee Communications - A Handbook cover

Localizing Employee Communications: A Handbook, by Ray Walsh. XML Press, 2019. Print, $24.95; Ebook, $19.95. 258 pages.

Localizing Employee Communications: A Handbook, by Ray Walsh. XML Press, 2019. Print, $24.95; Ebook, $19.95. 258 pages.

Everyone at least slightly involved in the language industry is acutely aware of the fact that local language is critical for products to sell and for ideas to spread. But one final frontier seems to be uncharted: corporate content.

As Val Swisher, CEO of Content Rules, Inc., writes in her forward to Ray Walsh’s Localizing Employee Communications, “employee communications, the internal content that the corporate headquarters shares with employees worldwide, seems to be stuck in the dark English ages.” In his book, Walsh paints the picture of how English-proficient upper managers, living in their ivory towers, frequently assume that their entire organizations speak that language well enough. And how they conclude that, as result, there’s no need to localize or transcreate their internal communications.

The author is a keen observer of the realities and complexities of contemporary corporate life, especially in large organizations with an international footprint. He uses his actual professional experience to demonstrate how that approach is wrong, and how corporate communications, run from the center, often fall terribly flat despite their best intentions.

Column

Localization Business School

Game yourself to the top

Andrew Lawless
Andrew Lawless is a certified coach and strategic interventionist. Lawless has presented to the Obama US White House and testified before the US Senate on the importance of professional development. He also served as a trainer and consultant to the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit.
Andrew Lawless headshot

It was right in front of me, but I failed to seize the opportunity to make it big in gaming. I just did not see or believe in its future. Some 30 years later, my older son uses Minecraft to test AI and my eight-year-old builds his own worlds in the same game. I challenge you to play it and not fall victim to the same universe’s sense of humor.

In 1988, I tested games for the then-leading computer magazine in Germany, 64er Magazin, published for users of the Commodore 64. I walked in and out of game developers’ offices. One of them, Rainbow Arts, even donated a free version of their marquee game, The Great Giana Sisters, to readers of my book. The soundtrack for the game has become one of the most popular video game soundtracks of all time. In 2015, an HD remake of the game was released for Nintendo DS.

Column

Off the Map

Growing global challenges to content creation

Kate Edwards
Kate Edwards is a geographer and the principal consultant of Geogrify, a Seattle-based consultancy for culturalization and content strategy. She is also the executive director of the Global Game Jam organization.
Kate Edwards headshot
Back in the “old days” of software creation and distribution (and I’m talking around the time period of the early-to-mid 1990s) most software was distributed on CD-ROMs and DVDs as packaged products that were physically shipped to specific markets. The producing company had the ability to specifically target their products to whichever markets they desired, and in the event that one of their product versions ended up in a non-targeted locale, they could rely upon a certain degree of plausible deniability. In other words, if the software’s content was not culturally or geopolitically compatible with a local market, and the product was not intended to ship there, the company could blame it on the black or gray markets and lessen their accountability.
But in the present, it’s not only the issue of digital distribution that has changed the dynamic of content creation, but also the rise of social media — the enabling of instant, targeted feedback from anyone, anywhere to any content producer. In this often-harsh environment of knee-jerk reactions without context, creators’ intentions have become mostly irrelevant. General discussions and mostly-civil disagreements around issues in early online forums have now mutated into full-blown culture wars, chiefly fueled by tech companies like Facebook and Twitter that make their profit off the clicks derived from this phenomenon. While there remain occasional pockets where people can have constructive dialogues, many have been siloed into online echo chambers that reinforce the inclusion of like-minded people while severely excluding those who think differently. This in turn has created highly toxic online environments where anything and everything is seemingly offered up for vitriolic debate — from religion to politics, from the latest game release or Star Wars film.

Focus

Essential data to ensure that your next game is multilingual
Rebecca Ray headshot

Rebecca Ray

Rebecca Ray is a senior analyst at the independent market research firm CSA Research. Ray’s primary research focus at CSA Research is enterprise globalization, multilingual SEO and global product development.

Essential data to ensure that your next game is multilingual
Rebecca Ray headshot

Rebecca Ray

Rebecca Ray is a senior analyst at the independent market research firm CSA Research. Ray’s primary research focus at CSA Research is enterprise globalization, multilingual SEO and global product development.

L

ocalization for gaming doesn’t come cheap. But there’s too much competition from local, regional and global developers to shortchange the requirement for local cultural and linguistic resonance. With companies such as Amazon, Apple and Google launching their streaming services to compete with the likes of Microsoft, Sony and Tencent across all devices, localization won’t be taking a back seat anytime soon for gaming producers. And there are four essential categories that allow you to leverage data to convince executives to boost language investment in your latest franchise.

However, executives require hard data before backing an investment proposal. What criteria should you use to make these budgetary decisions? Here are examples of the four classes of essential data that travel and leisure companies should consider to boost language support.
1. What type of localized experiences do your gamers prefer?
Visualize your gamers’ current and preferred localized experience with your organization throughout the various stages of their journey: awareness, discovery, attraction, purchase, use and advocacy. Identify possible gaps by comparing their current experience to global customer journey maps for each stage.

Focus

So you want to be a games localizer
MultiLingual January February 2020 From social media and customer help lines to actual brick-and-mortar stores, business-to-consumer (B2C) companies have a lot of channels to monitor.
Tugdual Delisle headshot
Tugdual Delisle
Tugdual Delisle is general manager of Lionbridge Games. A French native, he has been with Lionbridge since 2002 and works from the company’s Bellevue, Washington office.
Tugdual Delisle headshot
Tugdual Delisle
Tugdual Delisle is general manager of Lionbridge Games. A French native, he has been with Lionbridge since 2002 and works from the company’s Bellevue, Washington office.
S

o you already work as a translator and want to localize video games. You love playing them, so why not? But are the skills you use now transferrable? It’s not like the American Translators Association offers a certification for playing Mario Kart in Finnish, so what do you need to know in order to get the job?

Well, for starters, which job? Just as translating and interpreting are two separate careers with their own required qualifications, multilingual gaming professionals can hold a myriad of roles. Let’s take a look at the most popular ones and discuss the skill sets required for working in these roles.

  • Translators and localizers. Of all the linguist jobs in the gaming world, this one shares the most in common with more traditional translation roles. Video game translators and interpreters study the language, characters, visuals and other meaningful elements used in the original game and adapt them for new markets. The goal — as with other specializations — is to create an experience as flawless and fun in the localized version as it is in the source.

“It’s a full cultural perspective,” says SongYee Han, a localization expert in our company’s Beijing office. “It’s contextual understanding, it’s history. And it’s a lot of gut instinct.”

Focus

Game quality essentials
Eternal Magic gaming screenshot
Image copyright: Eternal Magic
Image copyright: Eternal Magic
Daria Tvorilova headshot
Daria Tvorilova
Daria Tvorilova is head of LQA at Allcorrect. She has been working in game localization testing for more than three years. In that time, she’s contributed to a number of major projects like Eternal Magic and Deponia. With more than a decade’s worth of experience playing games under her belt, she runs a gaming channel on YouTube and plays percussion in her free time.
Daria Tvorilova headshot
Daria Tvorilova
Daria Tvorilova is head of LQA at Allcorrect. She has been working in game localization testing for more than three years. In that time, she’s contributed to a number of major projects like Eternal Magic and Deponia. With more than a decade’s worth of experience playing games under her belt, she runs a gaming channel on YouTube and plays percussion in her free time.
L

ocalization quality assurance (LQA) is generally a service that third-party contractors are brought in to handle. There are different aspects to this, as well as different projects, and you never know what kind of supporting documentation you’re going to get. In some cases, QA testers only get the actual game or program they’re supposed to test; other times, they get a whole packet of information to accompany it. Both ways can work. But if that’s true, why bother sending anything at all besides the test build?

The difference is that QA work follows different tracks depending on what information the testers have access to. We put together the essentials kit of what you need for QA work. It includes:

  • A build
  • A test plan
  • Cheats
  • Reference materials

Let’s take a closer look at why all this is needed, as well as how QA works when we’re missing something from the list.

Focus

Design and evolution of the localization pipeline in Snowdrop
Virginia Boyero headshot

Virginia Boyero

Virginia Boyero headshot
Virginia Boyero
Virginia Boyero is an associate producer at Massive Entertainment | A Ubisoft Studio. She started in the games industry in 2006 through linguistic testing, before joining Massive in 2010. Virginia holds a degree in history, a passion that she shares with interactive media and language.
I

had just started as a localization project manager when I moved to Tom Clancy’s The Division, the first title released by the Snowdrop game engine in 2016. The first task of the localization taskforce was to develop the full pipeline, which would determine how all UI text was created and dealt with — a very rare opportunity, as game engines are not often developed from scratch.

There was a text database, but it was not connected to the game. All in-game text was hardcoded, embedded and scattered everywhere in the code. We had a few months to set it all up for the first playable version that required localization, an internal milestone that marked the end of preproduction and the start of the real production phase of the game.

The Snowdrop philosophy is centered around flexibility, fast iterations and empowerment of the developer to create content as free of obstacles as possible. In this spirit, the main request from the developers in regard to localization was to remove the intermediate steps for creating text. Traditionally, someone from the localization department is in charge of curating the database and creating all text on demand, as the features are designed and content is created. This had also been our experience from previous games developed at Massive, World in Conflict, AC Revelations and FarCry3.

High Quality Multilingual Game Localization – Text – Audio
Paris – Madrid – Mexico City

Focus

The future is here
Neural machine translation for games
Sim City gaming screenshot
Sim City, ea.com/games
Sim City, ea.com/games
Cristina Anselmi headshot
Inés Rubio headshot
Cristina Anselmi
Cristina Anselmi is a machine translation specialist at Electronic Arts Inc. based in Cologne, Germany. She’s been in the video game localization industry since 2012, managing multilingual projects from small mobile games to AAA titles.
Inés Rubio
Inés Rubio is a localization veteran with 15 years of gaming industry background, with further experience in eCommerce and marketing. Her interest in process improvement drove her to research potential MT applications to game localization.
Cristina Anselmi headshot
Cristina Anselmi
Cristina Anselmi is a machine translation specialist at Electronic Arts Inc. based in Cologne, Germany. She’s been in the video game localization industry since 2012, managing multilingual projects from small mobile games to AAA titles.
Inés Rubio headshot
Inés Rubio
Inés Rubio is a localization veteran with 15 years of gaming industry background, with further experience in eCommerce and marketing. Her interest in process improvement drove her to research potential MT applications to game localization.
M

achine translation (MT) has been a hot topic for a while, especially since the rise of neural machine translation (NMT). The output quality spike is finally shaping solutions to deal with ever-increasing volume and accelerated demand, remarkable even for the prudent gaming industry. Electronic Arts was an early adopter and gained some insights along the way.

The great spike in MT output quality can be dated back to 2016 when Google launched its neural system (GNMT). This technology has come a long way since the introduction of clumsy rule-based MT or even the improved statistical MT dominating the scene from the 1980s. Google was a pioneer providing easy access to NMT back in 2016, claiming that in some cases, human and GNMT translations were nearly indistinguishable.

MT technology has been available to the game localization industry on PCs for over 25 years without much success. Any technology that affects the traditional role of translators is not adopted easily, and MT was for a long time regarded as a standalone solution that would replace translators’ roles, instead of a way to assist them with work.

Despite this, with some tweaking and research, MT has proven to work well in many areas: online catalogs, customer-created content and “gisting,” where understanding the general meaning is the main goal. For video games, however, we need to account for gamers’ expectations — which are rightfully quite high.

Game Showcase

Focus

Localizing a whole new Western world
animated characters
Loreto Fueyo joined PTW in January 2019 as director of translation after 13+ years of industry experience. She holds a BA in English philology from the Universidad Complutense in Madrid, an MA in comparative literary studies from Kent University and an MSc in computational linguistics from King’s College London.
Loreto Fueyo headshot
Loreto Fueyo
Loreto Fueyo headshot
Loreto Fueyo
Loreto Fueyo joined PTW in January 2019 as director of translation after 13+ years of industry experience. She holds a BA in English philology from the Universidad Complutense in Madrid, an MA in comparative literary studies from Kent University and an MSc in computational linguistics from King’s College London.
V

ideo game localizations are unlike any other translation job. In addition to translation, there’s tone, story adaptation, context-dependant conversation and endless player interactions to consider, not to mention the sky-high expectations from seriously devoted fanbases. But localizing a game is also incredibly rewarding when you’re given the creative freedom to try new things, and especially when those things go right. And that’s just what happened when we localized LEVEL-5’s Yo-kai Watch 3 in 33 weeks.

Yo-Kai’s deep, deep history
To fully understand what a huge undertaking this localization was, it’s first important to understand Yo-kai Watch’s historical context.

For those unfamiliar, the first Yo-kai Watch game was released in Japan in 2013, setting the foundation for the rest of the series.

The Japanese sequel was released in 2014 with two different versions: Yo-Kai Watch 2 Honke (known as “Fleshy Souls” in English) and Yo-Kai Watch 2 Ganso (“Bony Spirits” in English). These two versions expanded the series considerably, not only with many new Yo-kai characters and locations, but a time travel element that multiplied its complexity.

Focus

Insider secrets to breaking into the Chinese game market

George Tong works in the United States as a senior account director at Beyondsoft, leading a team globalizing clients’ product portfolios. Beyondsoft has 15,000 employees worldwide and in 2012 became a publicly traded company on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The company has made six significant mergers and acquisitions in the US and China.

George Tong

George Tong

George Tong
George Tong

George Tong works in the United States as a senior account director at Beyondsoft, leading a team globalizing clients’ product portfolios. Beyondsoft has 15,000 employees worldwide and in 2012 became a publicly traded company on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The company has made six significant mergers and acquisitions in the US and China.

I

n the last decade, the gaming market in China has experienced massive acceleration. According to market intelligence firm IDC, Chinese game revenue ballooned from 18.5 billion RMB in 2008 to 214.4 billion RMB in 2018.

Growth in the mobile gaming market is also booming. In fact, mobile gaming revenue hit 133.9 billion RMB in 2018, comprising 62.5% of total gaming market. This rise can be attributed to increased internet access via phone data and wifi, especially important in rural China where most people rely on smartphones.

In 2018, China comprised 23.6% of the global gaming market, with 626 million players in China — almost half of the Chinese population. As overseas game creators and publishers continue investing in the Chinese market, this growth presents huge opportunities for game localization and testing.

So how do you break into this lucrative market? Here are some tips on entering the China gaming market and things that can help you establish your footprint.

Berlin | June 3-5, 2020
InterContinental Berlin, Germany
The world’s #1 Localization Conference & Exhibition Series
InterContinental Berlin, Germany
Engage Global Users
Experience a multitude of original, thought-provoking conference sessions.

Reconnect with attendees from previous events and make new connections.

Enjoy the friendly and open atmosphere with your peers.

Discover a wide range of new and returning exhibitors.

All next to Berlin’s beautiful Tiergarten Park, a pleasant walk from the iconic Brandenburg Gate.

Attendee registration openS MARCH 9

Learn more at locworld.com/locworld42

Focus
Gender and the Italian localization of Tomb Raider
Tomb Raider
Mirco Carlini
Mirco Carlini
Mirco Carlini is lead linguist at Creative Words, Italy, where he deals with translation, transcreation and localization. He holds an MA in specialized translation with a dissertation on game localization and gender studies. He started as a freelance video game translator and he is passionate about the game industry and its many possibilities and contradictions.
Mirco Carlini
Mirco Carlini
Mirco Carlini is lead linguist at Creative Words, Italy, where he deals with translation, transcreation and localization. He holds an MA in specialized translation with a dissertation on game localization and gender studies. He started as a freelance video game translator and he is passionate about the game industry and its many possibilities and contradictions.
G

ender-related issues in video games are undoubtedly a topical issue, and one that has been widely discussed, particularly in light of events such as Gamergate, a campaign of targeted harassment toward women in the video game industry which exposed a side of the gaming community that had previously been hidden.

The perception of gaming as a “boys’ club” has endured since the inception of the medium itself, and while currently game developers tend to cater to a more diverse audience by being generally more inclusive — not only toward women but also toward minorities, the LGBTQ+ community and so on — it is undeniable that during their, by now, several-decades-long history, video games have had their fair share of issues with gender representation.

In 1985, in the iconic Super Mario Bros, a mustachioed Italian plumber passed through numerous hoops and stomped on many enemies to, naturally, rescue a beautiful princess who rewarded him with a playful kiss on the cheek once she was freed from the evil Bowser. The damsel in distress trope, while certainly not new in literature or in art in general, is embodied in Super Mario Bros, a game where the player literally saves a damsel that is in distress. Countless examples can be found of negative gender stereotypes in video games, from The Legend Of Zelda to Resident Evil, but it’s worth noting that gaming companies themselves didn’t shy away from presenting gaming as a hobby geared toward young males: the most famous portable game console of all time, the Game Boy, has the word boy in its name. You can’t get much more literal than that. And yet, contrary to what the public perception might be, girls and women have always been an audience for video games. They may not have been the intended audience initially, but they were an audience nonetheless. In 2019, according to a report by Newzoo, women accounted for 46% of gaming enthusiasts, so it is now evident that the female audience is interested and engaged in the medium.

Localization
Why localization without personalization misses the mark
Why localization without personalization misses the mark
Scott Abel
Scott Abel
Scott Abel is an internationally recognized intelligent content strategist and cognitive computing evangelist. He is the coauthor of Intelligent Content: A Primer and The Language of Content Strategy (XML Press). Abel is the founder, CEO and chief strategist at The Content Wrangler, Inc. He coproduces Information Development World Conferences, produces a popular series of content strategy books and is the host of the San Francisco Content Strategy Content Marketing Professionals Meetup.
Scott Abel
Scott Abel
Scott Abel is an internationally recognized intelligent content strategist and cognitive computing evangelist. He is the coauthor of Intelligent Content: A Primer and The Language of Content Strategy (XML Press). Abel is the founder, CEO and chief strategist at The Content Wrangler, Inc. He coproduces Information Development World Conferences, produces a popular series of content strategy books and is the host of the San Francisco Content Strategy Content Marketing Professionals Meetup.
N

early a decade ago, I wrote an article for this magazine in which I argued that we should focus our efforts on solving the biggest technical content problem around: personalization.

Back then, my argument was this: unless you provide a personalized technical documentation experience, you aren’t delivering what consumers require, regardless of what languages they understand.

The stakes are high. Getting content wrong means missing out on new revenue streams worth $1.7 trillion to $3 trillion, according to an estimate by McKinsey & Company analysts.

When you make it inconvenient for consumers to find the information they need, they’re likely to turn to a web search engine or a virtual assistant for help. While searches sometimes lead to the information consumers require, they don’t usually yield the results consumers expect. And they don’t always find you or your content. Instead, consumers may discover content published by competitors.

Much of the information consumers seek about your products and services isn’t readily available to them. The content they seek does exist, but is far too often hidden from their view.

Technology
XLIFF mixed with XML functionalities

Angelika Zerfaß studied Chinese/Japanese and computational linguistics at the University of Bonn, Germany. After her studies she worked for the Japanese Embassy in Bonn and then for Trados in Japan, Germany and the US. Since 2000 she has been providing independent consultancy, training and technical support for translation tools from her company based in Germany for clients all over the world. She is a frequent speaker at translation and localization industry events.

Angelica Zerfaß

Angelica Zerfaß

Angelica Zerfaß
Angelica Zerfaß

Angelika Zerfaß studied Chinese/Japanese and computational linguistics at the University of Bonn, Germany. After her studies she worked for the Japanese Embassy in Bonn and then for Trados in Japan, Germany and the US. Since 2000 she has been providing independent consultancy, training and technical support for translation tools from her company based in Germany for clients all over the world. She is a frequent speaker at translation and localization industry events.

X

ML and XML Localization Interchange File Format (XLIFF) are often used for transporting text between systems, especially content systems and translation systems. But even though they’re great formats, there can be issues. The file format specification might not have been fully understood, or perhaps a user is trying to do things with these formats they were not intended for.

The technical project manager or localization engineer then might have to spend some time explaining to the client what a translatable file should look like or what a translation tool would expect from a specific file format. They will need to be able to spot the issues, understand why they are issues and potentially communicate this to non-technical employees on the customer side.

From my many years of practical experience finding the mistakes and making files behave in translation tools, I would like to share some of the most common issues I have seen. It might help someone provide their customers with some help on how to improve the translatability of their files.

image © Square Enix
image © Square Enix

buyer's guide

Elia

European Language Industry Association (Elia)

Elia is the European not-for-profit association of language service companies with a mission to accelerate our members’ business success. We do this by creating events and initiatives that anticipate and serve our members’ needs in building strong, sustainable companies, thereby strengthening the wider industry. Elia was founded in 2005 and has since established itself as the leading trade association for the language services industry in Europe.

Elia Brussels, Belgium
Email: info@elia-association.org
Web: http://elia-association.org

GALA

Globalization and Localization Association

The Globalization and Localization Association (GALA) is a global, nonprofit trade association for the language industry. As a membership organization, we support our member companies and the language sector by creating communities, championing standards, sharing knowledge and advancing technology.

Globalization and Localization Association
Seattle, WA USA
+1-206-494-4686
Email: info@gala-global.org
Web: www.gala-global.org

LocWorld

LocWorld

LocWorld conferences are dedicated to the language and localization industries. Our constituents are the people responsible for communicating across the boundaries of language and culture in the global marketplace. International product and marketing managers participate in LocWorld from all sectors and all geographies to meet language service and technology providers and to network with their peers. Hands-on practitioners come to share their knowledge and experience and to learn from others. See our website for details on upcoming and past conferences.

Localization World, Ltd.
Sandpoint, ID USA
208-263-8178

Desktop Publishing

Education

Desktop Publishing
Global DTP

Global DTP

Global DTP s.r.o., based in the Czech Republic, offers professional multilingual desktop publishing and media engineering solutions to the localization industry. Over the past 15 years, Global DTP has become one of the leading DTP/multimedia companies. We have been delivering high-quality and cost-effective services for at least eight of the top 20 LSPs and many other companies/agencies. Due to our extensive experience in localization and knowledge of the prepress, media and publishing industries, our team of 20 in-house professionals handles more than 1,000 projects every year. Our core services are multilingual desktop publishing, multimedia and eLearning engineering.

Global DTP s.r.o. Brno,
Czech Republic
+420 3 574 709
Email: info@global-dtp.com
Web: www.global-dtp.com
Hornet Design Studio

Hornet Design Studio

Since 2005, Hornet Design Studio has been focusing on delivering quality services in a timely manner. A highly skilled team of professionals is always ready to meet expectations of even the most demanding clients. Looking to achieve that goal, we develop and expand. Therefore we now offer not only DTP but also multimedia, eLearning and voiceover services.
Languages: All
Hornet Design Studio
Bydgoszcz, 
Poland
+48525290553
Email: office@hornetdesign.eu
Web: http://hornetdesign.eu

Education

The Localization Institute

Quality Training in Localization & Global Marketing

The Localization Institute is the leader in educational advancement in the field of localization — the adaptation of products and services for international markets. We organize comprehensive, vendor-neutral conferences (LocWorld and Brand2Global), seminars and round tables where participants gain insights that help their companies better succeed in international business. In addition, The Institute has partnered with top universities and professional associations to develop comprehensive certification programs in localization project management, quality management, internationalization and global digital marketing.

The Localization Institute Madison, WI USA
608-826-5001
Email: kris@localizationinstitute.com
Web: www.localizationinstitute.com

Enterprise Solutions

Star Group
STAR Group
Multiple Platforms

STAR is a leader in information management, localization, internationalization and globalization services and solutions such as GRIPS (Global Real Time Information Processing Solution), STAR CLM (Corporate Language Management) including Transit (Translation & Localization), TermStar/WebTerm (Terminology Management), STAR MT (Corporate Machine Translation), STAR WebCheck (Online Translation Reviewing) and Mind-Reader (Authoring Assistance). With more than 50 offices in 30 countries and a global network of prequalified freelance translators, STAR provides a unique combination of information management tools and services required to manage all phases of the product information life cycle.
Languages: All

STAR AG (STAR Group headquarters)
Ramsen, Switzerland,
+41-52-742-9200
Email: info@star-group.net
Web: www.star-group.net
STAR Group America, LLC Lyndhurst, OH USA
216-691-7827
Email: lyndhurst@star-group.net

Localization Services

Crestec

Number 1 LSP that you should know

Crestec is a world-class language service provider. CSA Research ranks Crestec as a global top 5 LSP in the technology sector and global top 6 in the manufacturing sector. Headquartered in Japan with a network of over 18 sites in the US, Europe and Asia, we offer a one-stop comprehensive solution for global communications from marketing content creation and technical writing to localization, printing and studio/shooting production.
Languages: Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Korean, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish

Crestec Long Beach, CA , USA
612-986-3108
Email: aki.ito@crestecusa.com
Europe: Amsterdam
+31 205854640
Email: sales@crestec.nl
Web: https://crestecusa.com
E4

Total Solutions for Your Business

E4NET is a total localization solutions provider including translation, DTP, recording, and specialized in Asian localization covering all major Asian and regional tier 3 languages. We have 20+ years of successful localization production experience with major projects for IBM, Microsoft, SAP, Oracle, HP, LG Electronics, Panasonic and more. E4NET is now providing patent translation services to the Korea Institute of Patent Information and translating life science projects including clinical protocols and reports. We are continuously developing and applying innovative technologies such as machine translation and associated customer services throughout our production process to maximize production/service efficiency. ISO 9001: 2015, ISO 27001 certified.
Languages: 60+

E4NET Co., Ltd. Seoul, South Korea
82-2-3465-8532
Email: l10n@e4net.net
Web: www.e4net.net

EuroGreek Translations LTD

EuroGreek Translations Limited

Established in 1986, EuroGreek Translations Limited is Europe’s leading Greek localizer, specializing in medical, technical, financial and legal translations from EN/DE/FR/ES to EL and EL to EN. Our aim is to provide high-quality, turnkey solutions, encompassing a whole range of client needs, from translation to localization, desktop publishing and testing. Our DTP department covers all Latin and Cyrillic alphabet-based languages, in addition to Greek, at very competitive rates. All of EuroGreek’s work is produced in-house by a team of 30 highly qualified specialists and is fully guaranteed for quality and on-time delivery.
Languages: Greek to/from English; French, German, Spanish to Greek

EuroGreek Translations Limited
Athens, Greece
30-210-9628-559

Mobico

Mobico – by Saltlux Inc.

Mobico is the new brand name of Saltlux’s technical communication services, and is also the name of the predecessor company to Saltlux, established in 1979 as Korea’s first TC business. What started as a small enterprise concentrating on creating Korean manuals and East Asian language translations evolved into a one-stop service provider for all your needs in the world of business today, including multilingual translation, localization, DTP, TW and MTPE. The relentless pursuit of progress and perfection results in the use of state-of-the-art technology and processes, which in turn lead to superior translation quality with shorter turn-around times and therefore to greater customer satisfaction.
Languages: More than 70 languages

Saltlux, Inc. Seoul, South Korea
+82-2-2193-1725
Email: sales@mobico.com
Web: www.mobico.com/en

ORCO S.A. Localization Services

ORCO S.A. Localization Services

Founded in 1983, ORCO celebrates this year its 35th anniversary. Over the years, ORCO has built a reputation for excellence and gained the trust of leading companies, such as Oracle, IBM and Carrier for the localization of their products. Our core business activities include technical, medical, legal, financial, marketing and other translations, software and multimedia localization, as well as localization consulting. We cover most European languages and our client list includes long-term collaborations with international corporations, government institutions, banks, private enterprises, NGOs and the European Union. ORCO is certified according to ISO 17100 and ISO 9001 quality standards.
Languages: Greek and European languages

ORCO S.A Athens, Greece
+30-210-723-6001
Email: info@orco.gr
Web: www.orco.gr

RWS Moravia
RWS Moravia

RWS Moravia is a leading globalization solutions provider, enabling companies in the IT, consumer electronics, retail, media and entertainment, and travel and hospitality industries to enter global markets with high-quality multilingual products and services. RWS Moravia’s solutions include localization, testing, content creation, machine translation implementations, technology consulting and global digital marketing services. Our customers include eight of Fortune’s Top 20 Most Admired Companies, and all of the “Fab 5 Tech Stock” companies from 2017. Our global headquarters is in Brno, Czech Republic, and we have local offices in Europe, the United States, Japan, China and Latin America. To learn more, please visit us at www.rws.com/moravia.
Languages: over 250

RWS Moravia
USA HQ: Thousand Oaks, CA USA
+1-805-262-0055
Europe HQ: Brno, Czech Republic
+420-545-552-222
Spark logo
A creative approach to localization
At Spark, we fuse creativity with technology to provide a localization+ service. Helping brands like Microsoft, Disney and Netflix to develop and deliver consistent global branding and hyperlocal content creation from marketing activation to packaging. Providing creative expertise across the entire consumer journey, continuous workflow solutions and seamless integration into business systems: making a real difference to your localization needs.
Languages: 120+

Spark - Brighter Thinking
Europe: London, UK
4+44 (0)207 602 9119
Email: hello@sparkbrighterthinking.com
Web: www.sparkbrighterthinking.com

Vistatec

Vistatec

We have been helping some of the world’s most iconic brands to optimize their global commercial potential since 1997. Vistatec is one of the world's most innovative, progressive and successful localization solutions providers. Headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, with offices in Mountain View, California, USA. Think Global.
Languages: All

Vistatec
Europe: Dublin, Ireland, 353-1-416-8000
North America: Mountain View, CA USA
408-898-2364
Email: info@vistatec.com
Web: www.vistatec.com

Joint National Committee for Languages

Joint National Committee for Languages

The Joint National Committee for Languages and the National Council for Languages and International Studies (JNCL-NCLIS) represent the interests of over 140 member organizations, associations and companies in virtually all aspects of the language enterprise — education PreK-20, research, training, assessment, translation, interpreting and localization — to the US government. The mission of JNCL-NCLIS is to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity to learn English and at least one other language.

Joint National Committee for Languages – National Council for Languages and International Studies
Garrett Park, MD USA, 202-580-8684
Email: info@languagepolicy.org
Web: http://languagepolicy.org

Translations Commons

Translation Commons

Translation Commons is a nonprofit US public charity powered by translators. We are a volunteer-based online community aiming to help our language community thrive and bridge all the sectors within our industry. We facilitate cross-functional collaboration among the diverse sectors and stakeholders within the language industry and instigate transparency, trust and free knowledge. Our mission is to offer free access to tools and all other available resources, to facilitate community-driven projects, to empower linguists and to share educational and language assets.

Translation Commons Las Vegas, NV USA
(310) 405-4991
Email: krista@translationcommons.org
Web: www.translationcommons.org

EuroGreek Translations LTD

Translators without Borders

Originally founded in 1993 in France as Traducteurs sans Frontières by Lori Thicke and Ros Smith-Thomas to link the world's translators to vetted NGOs that focus on health and education, Translators without Borders (TWB) is a US nonprofit organization that aims to close the language gaps that hinder critical humanitarian efforts worldwide. TWB recognizes that the effectiveness of any aid program depends on delivering information in the language of the affected population.
Languages: 190 language pairs

Translators without Borders
CT USA

Anzu Global

Globalization Staffing Services

Anzu Global is the premier bilingual staffing company in the US with a combined 75 years of localization staffing experience. We provide contract and full-time globalization personnel for technology clients and language service providers (LSPs). Our services include staffing for: executive search, localization program/project managers, translators, editors, MT post editing, LSP business development/sales, computational linguists, bilingual AI programmers/strategists, internationalization/localization engineers and bilingual QA engineers.

Anzu Global Acton, MA, USA
978-429-8014
Email: mklinger@anzuglobal.com
Web: https://anzuglobal.com
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Consoltec

Consoltec
Multiple Platforms

Consoltec offers FlowFit-TMS, a web-based translation management system that helps you simplify and optimize your projects, while reducing your administrative costs. FlowFit can also be used for many other project types. FlowFit provides fully customizable web portals for clients, providers and project management. Get an accurate overview of your teams’ workload in real time and select the best available providers. Manage your clients, contacts and internal/external providers effectively with the new CRM features. Use Timesheet to track the time spent on projects and tasks. Connect seamlessly to your favorite CAT tools (memoQ, SDL Studio, LogiTerm) and get comprehensive reports that provide enhanced insight on production, productivity, costs and translation memory efficiency.

Consoltec Montreal, Québec, Canada
(+1) 514 312-2485
Email: 
info@consoltec.ca
Web: 
www.consoltec.ca
Localize

Localize

Localize offers a full-featured, cloud-based content and translation management system that features advanced translation workflows, allowing content managers and translators to propose, review, and publish translations with ease. For companies without in-house translators, we provide access to high-quality, on-demand translations through our network of professional translators. Our easy to install plugin fits neatly into your existing technology stack. The technology powering the Localize Platform was built from the ground up to minimize the need for engineers in the localization process. This reduces costs by enabling nontechnical personnel to manage the localization workflow. Getting started is easy. Start your free trial today!
Languages: All

Localize Kingston, NY, USA
(415) 651-7030
Email: 
sales@localizejs.com
Web: 
https://localizejs.com
Memsource

Memsource

Memsource is a leading cloud-based translation management system that enables global companies, translation agencies and translators to collaborate in one secure, online location. Internationally recognized for providing an easy-to-use, yet powerful CAT tool combined with a TMS, Memsource processes two billion words per month from over 200,000 users around the world. Manage your translation projects in real-time in an intelligent platform that accepts over 50 file types and offers REST API, out-of-the-box CMS connectors and powerful workflow automation to save time and money. Join localization professionals from around the world who rely on Memsource to streamline their translation process. To start your free 30-day trial, visit www.memsource.com.
Languages: All

Memsource Prague, Czech Republic
+420 221 490 441
Email: 
info@memsource.com
Web: 
www.memsource.com

Plunet

Plunet BusinessManager
Multiple Platforms

Plunet develops and markets the business and workflow management software Plunet BusinessManager — one of the world’s leading management solutions for the translation and localization industry. Plunet BusinessManager provides a high degree of automation and flexibility for professional language service providers and translation departments. Using a web-based platform, Plunet integrates translation software, financial accounting and quality management systems. Various functions and extensions of Plunet BusinessManager can be adapted to individual needs within a configurable system. Basic functions include quote, order and invoice management, comprehensive financial reports, flexible job and workflow management as well as deadline, document and customer relationship management.

Plunet GmbH Berlin, Germany
+49 (0)30-322-971-340
Email: info@plunet.com
Web: www.plunet.com

Smartcat

Smartcat

At Smartcat we believe the translation industry should be better for everyone. We connect linguists, companies and agencies to streamline the translation of any content into every language on demand. Our platform helps you build and manage translation teams, and puts your translation process on autopilot from content creation to payments. The unique features of Smartcat are our marketplace, where you can find translators for any language with one click; our CAT tool, translation using an AI-assisted platform, a team management with full control of your team, suppliers and content and payment automation: pay vendors easily across the globe. You can start experiencing the next generation of translation technologies and boost your translation business efficiency from day one.
Languages: All

Smartcat Cambridge, MA USA
Email: 
support@smartcat.ai
Web:
 www.smartcat.ai

Smartling

Smartling

Smartling Translation Cloud is the leading translation management platform and language services provider to localize content across devices and platforms. Smartling’s data-driven approach and visual context capabilities uniquely positions brands for efficiency. Seamlessly connect your CMS, code repository, and marketing automation tools to Smartling’s TMS via prebuilt integrations, web proxy, or REST APIs. No matter the content type, Smartling automation tools help you do more with less. Smartling is the platform of choice for B2B and B2C brands, including InterContinental Hotels Group, GoPro, Shopify, Slack, and SurveyMonkey. The company is headquartered in New York, with offices in Dublin and London. For more information, please visit Smartling.com.

Smartling
New York, NY USA
1-866-707-6278

Wordbee Translator

Wordbee Translator
Web-based

Wordbee is the leading choice for enterprises and language service providers that need to save money and make their company run more efficiently. Wordbee has the most complete feature set of any cloud solution: project management, portal, business analytics, reporting, invoicing and a user-friendly translation editor. Tasks such as project and workflow setup, job assignment, deadline calculation, multiple phase kick-offs and cost management can all be automated in the collaborative translation platform. Also, the Beebox connects CMSs, DMSs or any propriety database source with the TMS of the translation vendor or internal translation team.
Languages: All

Wordbee Soleuvre, Luxembourg
+352 2877 1204
Email:
 info@wordbee.com
Web: 
www.wordbee.com

ASTW logo

Translation Services into Italian

ASTW is an Italian language service provider that offers translation services into Italian. ASTW has historically gained extensive experience in patent translations and is now the provider of numerous international intellectual property consultancy firms. The other specializations include translations in the life science, legal and technical fields. ASTW also offers (light and full) post-editing services for pre-translated texts through machine translation in many areas. Other services include technical writing and medical writing services in English and Italian.

ASTW Genova, Italy
+390100980766
Email: info@a-stw.com
Web: www.a-stw.com/en/contact-us
birotranslations

birotranslations

Founded in 1992, birotranslations specializes in life science, legal, technical, IT and automotive translations into all East European languages (Albanian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Ukrainian). We have a long-term partnership with the world's top 100 MLVs and many end-clients all around the globe. With our experienced project managers, extensive network of expert linguists and usage of the latest CAT tool technology, your projects will be delivered on time, within budget and with the highest standards of quality. For more information, please contact Mr. Matic Berginc (details below).
Languages: Eastern European languages

birotranslations Ljubljana, Slovenia
+386 590 43 557
Email: projects@birotranslations.com
Web: www.birotranslations.com

GlobalWay Co.

GlobalWay Co., Ltd.

As an industry-leading localization company in Korea, GlobalWay has been providing incomparable professional localization services with exceptional quality to partners all around the globe since 2003. We are here to offer language solutions including translation, voiceover, testing, DTP, and engineering services. Our highly qualified in-house linguists in each field of expertise, experienced engineers, and project managers will add value to your growing business. GlobalWay and its long-term global partners are ready to support you on the road to success. Are you looking for a reliable partner? Our doors are wide open for you. Should you need more information, please feel free to contact us.
Languages: 50+ more languages including Korean, English, Chinese, Japanese, German, Russian, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian.

GlobalWay Co., Ltd. Seoul, South Korea
+82-2-3453-4924
Email: sales@globalway.co.kr
Web: www.globalway.co.kr

Hansem logo
Your Partner in Asia and Beyond!

With our headquarters in Korea, our production offices in Vietnam and China, and our sales office in the US, we are in an excellent position to be your Asian language localization partner. For localizing projects from English or German into Asian languages, such as Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian and Burmese, you can trust our professional translation services for IT, software, marketing/transcreation and technical projects. Since our establishment in 1990, we have been at the forefront of the localization industry as one of the Asia Top Ten and the No. 1 LSP in Korea (by CSA Research). ISO17100 certified since 2014.
Languages: More than 54 languages including Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian.

Hansem, Inc.
Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
+82-31-226-5042
Email: info@hansem.com
Web: https://hansem.com/en

iDISC

iDISC Information Technologies

iDISC, established in 1987, is an ISO 9001 and ISO 17100 certified language and software company based in Barcelona with branches and teams in Mexico, Brazil, USA, Argentina, Bolivia and Guatemala. We have dedicated teams for web content, software localization and translation of technical, business, automotive, biomedical and marketing documents. Our software development engineers and translation teams provide high-quality and on-time production solutions that are cost-efficient, flexible and scalable.
Languages: Spanish (all variants), Portuguese (all variants), Catalan, Basque, Galician, Valencian, K'iche', Quechua, Aymara, Guarani

iDISC Information Technologies, S.L. Barcelona, Spain
34-93-778-73-00
Email: info@idisc.com
Web: www.idisc.com

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Medilingua Translations
Medical Translations Only

MediLingua is one of the few medical translation specialists in Europe. We only do medical. We provide all European languages and the major languages of Asia and Africa, as well as translation-related services to manufacturers of devices, instruments, in vitro diagnostics and software; pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies; medical publishers; national and international medical organizations; and other customers in the medical sector. Projects include the translation of documentation for medical devices, surgical instruments, hospital equipment and medical software; medical information for patients, medical students and physicians; scientific articles; press releases; product launches; clinical trial documentation; medical news; and articles from medical journals.
Languages: 45, including all EU languages

MediLingua Medical Translations BV
Leiden, Netherlands
+31-71-5680862
Email: info@medilingua.com
Web: www.medilingua.com

Rheinschrift

Rheinschrift Language Services

Outstanding localization requires world-class experience. Rheinschrift gives your business a native voice in the German-speaking world. We offer more than 20 years’ experience providing translations and localizations for software and hardware manufacturers as well as for the sectors of business, technology, legal matters and medicine/medical applications. Our services also range from glossaries, post-editing, project management and desktop publishing services to many other related services. Rely on Rheinschrift to deliver the most competent translations and meet your deadline, whatever it takes.
Languages: German to/from major European languages

Rheinschrift Language Services Cologne, Germany
+49 (0)221-80-19-28-0
Email: contact@rheinschrift.de
Web: www.rheinschrift.de
Translated.
Translated.
Professional translation services made easy. Crafted by expert humans, powered by technology, efficiently delivered. We have delivered 1.2 million translations in 150 languages to 134,091 clients in 40 macro-domains since 1999, powering the globalization strategy of the most demanding clients. We work hard to make translation services more effective, by enhancing our production processes with great technologies and talented people. A perfect example is T-Rank™, the system that instantly matches your content with the most qualified translator for the job. We offer a wide range of linguistic services that cover all your future needs: Google Ads translation, software localization, subtitling, and APIs to integrate human translation. We open up language to everyone.
Languages: 150 languages and 40 areas of expertise.
Translated Rome, Italy
+390690254001
memoQ

memoQ

memoQ is a technology provider that has been delivering premium solutions to the translation industry since 2004. For almost 15 years, memoQ has been dedicated to delivering innovation through diverse developments that today help hundreds of thousands of freelance translators, translation companies and enterprises worldwide. Having simplicity and more effective translation processes in mind, memoQ combines ease of use, collaboration, interoperability and leveraging in one single tool. Discover a new world with memoQ, and let our team help optimize your translation processes and make your business more successful.
Languages: All

memoQ Budapest, Hungary
+3618088313
Email: sales@memoq.com
Web: www.memoq.com

SDL plc
SDL plc
SDL is the global innovator in language translation technology, translation services and content management. Over the past 25 years we’ve helped companies deliver transformative business results by enabling powerful, nuanced digital experiences with customers around the world. SDL is the leading provider of translation software to the translation industry and SDL Trados Studio is recognized globally as the preferred computer-assisted translation tool of government, commercial enterprises, language service providers and freelance translators.
Languages: All
SDL plc
Maidenhead, United Kingdom
+44-1628-417227

Column

Takeaway

Ingrid Cruz headshot
Ingrid Cruz

Ingrid Cruz is a freelance writer, independent film director and sometimes a digital nomad. She worked as an interpreter and translator for seven years. She has a studio arts degree from the University of California, Irvine.

Français libre

It was a beautiful fall day, and I was sitting in the living room with my roommates in Mexico City in 2008, where I was studying abroad. The TV was blaring and we were discussing lucha libre, or Mexican wrestling.

I lived in a private dorm near the hospital district and had roommates from several Mexican states: Veracruz, Oaxaca and Puebla. I was the only one from the United States, and am Salvadoran-American. There was only one real foreigner there, a French exchange student named Nico who hailed from Nantes. He listened to us and then, in an amused voice, he flatly explained that Mexican lucha libre is from France.

We protested his claims. How dare he imply that lucha libre comes from France?! It was probably a relic of the pre-Colombian era! It was a Mexican version of wrestling! No way was lucha libre from the same culture that brought us romance and croissants! Baffled, we teased him quite a bit and started to Google lucha libre. The common room where we hung out got quiet.

Our annoying roommate was right.

Lucha libre arrived to Mexico via the French, but the sport has Greco-Roman roots and has existed since around 3000 BCE, according to historians. Like anything else, the sport evolved quite a bit, but it wouldn’t have existed without Napoleon III and his failed mission to take over Mexico.

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